Self-Review /Internal Evaluation

Explain how the internal self-review process is used as a tool to evaluate and improve Learning and Teaching, Collaboration and Governance and Management practices, to ensure quality early childhood education. Consider how early childhood education services involve families/whānau and children in the self-review process of preparing, gathering, making sense of information, and deciding.

Examine and critically reflect on the planning processes for a review, in order to evaluate and improve programs and pedagogies within early childhood settings

Required Readings use only this readings

Arthur, L., Beecher, B., Death, E., Dockett, S., & Farmer, S. (2018). Programming and planning in early childhood settings (7th ed., pp. 276-329). South Melbourne, Australia: Thomson.

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Biermeier, M.A. (2015). Inspired by Reggio Emilia: Emergent curriculum in relationship-driven learning environments. Young Children, 70(5), 72-79.

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Brierley, A. (2013). Passionately interested in planning. (Still).
Retrieved from http://www.elp.co.nz/files/brierley_alison_passionately_interested_in_planning_still-2.pdf
Download

Christie, T. (2011). Respect: A practitioner’s guide to calm & nurturing infant care & education (pp. 11 -27). Wellington, New Zealand: Childspace Early Childhood Institute.

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Dolby, R. (2017). The circle of security: Roadmap to building supportive relationships (pp. 4, 9-14). Deakin West, Australia: Early childhood Australia Inc.

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Education Review Office. (2016). Early years curriculum: What’s important and what works.
Retrieved from http://www.ero.govt.nz/publications/early-learning-curriculum
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Gonzalez-Mena, J. (2013). What works? Assessing infant and toddler play environments. Young Children, 68(4), 22-25.

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Hadley, F. (2012). Early childhood staff and families’ perceptions: Diverse views about important experiences for children aged 3-5 years in early childhood settings. Contemporary Issues in Early Childhood, 13(1), 38-48.

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Isaacs, B. (2012). Understanding the Montessori approach (pp.46-65). London, UK: Taylor & Francis.

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Krasch, D., & Carter, D. (2009). Monitoring classroom behaviour in early childhood: Using group observation data to make decisions. Early Childhood Education Journal, 36, 475-482.

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Lee, W., Carr, M., Soutar, B., & Mitchell, L. (2013). Weaving: documentation, assessment and planning. In P. Brunton & L. Thornton (Eds.) Understanding the Te Whāriki approach: Early years education in practice (pp. 106-133). London, UK: Routledge.

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McMullen M.B. (2017). Continuity of care with infants and toddlers. Exchange (Jan/Feb), 46-50.

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Ministry of Education. (2011). Tataiako: Cultural competencies for teachers of Māori learners.
Retrieved from https://teachingcouncil.nz/sites/default/files/Tataiako_FINAL_web_mar16.pdf
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Nicol, J. (2007). Bringing the Steiner Waldorf approach to your early years practice (pp. 5-16).
Retrieved from http://www.ebscohost.com
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Penman, R. (2014). E-portfolios: Connecting with parents, whānau and teachers in kindergarten communities. Early Education, 56, 10-13.

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Rokx, R. (Ed.). (2016). Te Reo Māori: He taonga mō ā tātou mokopuna (pp.110-115). Auckland, New Zealand: New Zealand Tertiary College.

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Skerrett, M. (2018). Te Kōhanga Reo: Early childhood education and the politics of language and cultural maintenance in Aotearoa, New Zealand. A personal –political story. In L. Miller, C. Cameron, C. Dalli, & N.Barbour (Eds.), The Sage handbook of early childhood policy (pp. 433-451). [EBSCO eBooks version].
Retrieved from http://www.ebscohost.comDownload

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